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History and Literature in the Elizabethan era : The Renaissance

Historical and literary changes that took place at the time of Queen Elizabeth The Renaissance in England somehow awoke from the long sleep of the Dark Ages. Europe has always been an inactive and deteriorating society that has so far benefited from the promise of material and spiritual prosperity. There was a well-held belief that humankind is making progress toward perfection in the pursuit of a perfect life. Renaissance means rebirth. The fourteenth to sixteenth centuries in Europe saw a break from understanding the subtle ways of life. Reputable landowners are losing their grandeur over the lower classes, as opportunities for growth and prosperity become evident in growing urban areas. As in Italy, the educated class regained the grace and strength of their old, pagan customs. Greek and Roman mythology and philosophy were the catalysts for a new wave of artistic flow. Sensible people have embraced the line of reasoning known as “mankind,” in which humans believed that they coul

Here is what you can learn in grammar usages about diseases.

Grammar and Diseases Here is what you can learn in grammar usages about diseases. Recently, in several articles, I came across the points, which might be helpful and easy to remember for exam tips. Use of articles She is suffering from the fever. (wrong) (no article needed before the name of a disease). She is suffering from the measles . (right) (because the name of disease appears in plural form.) In the above-mentioned sentences, we see that use of an article before the name of a disease is wrong. Because if any disease name appears singular we never use the article ‘the’ but if in case there comes any name of the disease in plural form there we use the article ‘the’. Use of fixed prepositions If want to say that some died just because of a disease we say: Died of + name of a disease. Examples He has died of the corona . (Because this is the name of the virus.) He has died of cancer. However, if want to say that the particular person or an animal is suffering

Does John Donne trust on womankind?

Does John Donne trust on womankind? John Donne, a man of romantic nature. He spent his life with several rich women and prostitutes in London. Perhaps he had gone through experiences of distrust. Therefore, he found himself sceptical towards beautiful women. He had shown his cynical attitude through his song “Go and Catch a Falling Star’. His poem came to in light 1597 In 'Songs and Sonnets', notably, he was unmarried at that time. In this poem, he shows his great distrust towards women. To favour his arguments he includes many examples of improbable tasks, which no one can do completely. GO, AND CATCH A FALLING STAR Go and catch a falling star, Get with child a mandrake root, Tell me where all past years are, Or who cleft the devil's foot, Teach me to hear mermaids singing, Or to keep off envy's stinging, And find What wind Serves to advance an honest mind. If thou be'st born to strange sights, Things invisible to see, Ride ten thousand

Tennyson as a representative Victorian Poet.

Alfred Lord Tennyson was a true representative of The Victorian Age Alfred Lord Tennyson was a true representative of The Victorian Age, the Age of reformation. England named this age after the name of Queen Victoria. England witnessed growth science and industry during this period. The reforms in this period not only affected the social, political but also arts. He was born at Somersby, Lincolnshire in England in 1809. Changes that occurred during this age affected greatly the works by Tennyson. He selected the subjects from medieval legends to classical myths and from domestic lives to the observations from nature. John Keats and other romantic poets greatly inspired his works. He was the master of rhythm. We have seen In ‘Break, Break, Break’ he emphasized the relentless sadness of the subject matter. He turned on the musical quality of words to make it sensitive. The poet lived in a period of scientific advancement and we can see conflict between scientific theories and religious f

Break Break Break contains Tennyson's feelings feelings of nostalgia.

Break, Break, Break Break Break Break describes feelings of loss. The poem has a strong biographical connection with Alfred Lord Tennyson's life. The poem contains his feelings of melancholy along with his feelings of nostalgia. The poet wrote Break, Break, Break during early 1835, and published in, 1842. This is an elegy that describes the poet’s feelings of loss after his friend, Arthur Hallam died. The poem is extremely simple in form and color. SUMMARY Tennyson’s loss is both personal and profound. There is a cyclone of pain rising in the heart of the poet, a storm similar to that of the sea. WhereasThe angler’s boy and the sailor lads are merry. Nevertheless, the poet stands grief-stricken, as the memories of the past gather in his mind. Break, break, break, On thy cold gray stones, O Sea! And I would that my tongue could utter The thoughts that arise in me. In the first stanza, the poet says that the torment of his heart as the death of his friend is tremendous. T

How did Shakespeare try to immortalize his Friend W.H.?

Like as the Waves  In most of the sonnets, Shakespeare referred to his friend a Mr. W.H. though his friend’s Identity is not cleared anywhere that whoever he may be. He might be Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, or Sir Philipp Sydney’s nephew, William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke. Shakespeare is talking about the same friend W.H. in Like as The Waves. In the sonnet, the poet is saying that his verse in praise of his friend will make him, immortal despite the cruel hands of time. This poem seems inspired by Golding’s translation of Ovid’s  Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, The very first opening line of the sonnet is introduced with the applied figure of speech simile. Where the poet compares the lives with the waves that come out of from the bottom of the sea and end at the shore. So do our minutes hasten to their end; In the second line, the poet said in his positive agreement format that the same way our lives within time continue and end.  Each changing plac

The contribution of female poets of Romantic Age

The contribution of female poets of Romantic Age Elizabeth Inchbald (1753-1821)  English novelist, actor, and playwright, Elizabeth Inchbald was born in a small village called Standing field near Bury St. Edmunds in Suffolk, England in 1753. She was the eighth child of John Simpson, a farmer, and his wife Mary. Inchbald’s father dies early living the family to the care of her mother. Inchbald went to London in 1772 to seek her fortune on the stage. She struggled to find work because of her speech impediment. She married actor Joseph Inchbald in June 1772 and began working seriously as an actor. She made her first dramatic appearance on 4th September 1772, as the character Cordelia opposite her husband‘s King Lear in Shakespeare’s King Lear. Plays Mogul Tale or the Descent of the Balloon (1784) Appearance is against them (1785) I’ll Tell You What 1785 The Widow’s Vow 1786 Novels  A simple Story (1791) Nature and Art (1796) Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) British Fe