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Here is what you can learn in grammar usages about diseases.

Grammar and Diseases Here is what you can learn in grammar usages about diseases. Recently, in several articles, I came across the points, which might be helpful and easy to remember for exam tips. Use of articles She is suffering from the fever. (wrong) (no article needed before the name of a disease). She is suffering from the measles . (right) (because the name of disease appears in plural form.) In the above-mentioned sentences, we see that use of an article before the name of a disease is wrong. Because if any disease name appears singular we never use the article ‘the’ but if in case there comes any name of the disease in plural form there we use the article ‘the’. Use of fixed prepositions If want to say that some died just because of a disease we say: Died of + name of a disease. Examples He has died of the corona . (Because this is the name of the virus.) He has died of cancer. However, if want to say that the particular person or an animal is suffering

How did Shakespeare try to immortalize his Friend W.H.?

Like as the Waves  In most of the sonnets, Shakespeare referred to his friend a Mr. W.H. though his friend’s Identity is not cleared anywhere that whoever he may be. He might be Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, or Sir Philipp Sydney’s nephew, William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke. Shakespeare is talking about the same friend W.H. in Like as The Waves. In the sonnet, the poet is saying that his verse in praise of his friend will make him, immortal despite the cruel hands of time. This poem seems inspired by Golding’s translation of Ovid’s  Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, The very first opening line of the sonnet is introduced with the applied figure of speech simile. Where the poet compares the lives with the waves that come out of from the bottom of the sea and end at the shore. So do our minutes hasten to their end; In the second line, the poet said in his positive agreement format that the same way our lives within time continue and end.  Each changing plac

The contribution of female poets of Romantic Age

The contribution of female poets of Romantic Age Elizabeth Inchbald (1753-1821)  English novelist, actor, and playwright, Elizabeth Inchbald was born in a small village called Standing field near Bury St. Edmunds in Suffolk, England in 1753. She was the eighth child of John Simpson, a farmer, and his wife Mary. Inchbald’s father dies early living the family to the care of her mother. Inchbald went to London in 1772 to seek her fortune on the stage. She struggled to find work because of her speech impediment. She married actor Joseph Inchbald in June 1772 and began working seriously as an actor. She made her first dramatic appearance on 4th September 1772, as the character Cordelia opposite her husband‘s King Lear in Shakespeare’s King Lear. Plays Mogul Tale or the Descent of the Balloon (1784) Appearance is against them (1785) I’ll Tell You What 1785 The Widow’s Vow 1786 Novels  A simple Story (1791) Nature and Art (1796) Mary Wollstonecraft (1759-1797) British Fe