Posts

Showing posts with the label Simile

How did Shakespeare try to immortalize his Friend W.H.?

Like as the Waves  In most of the sonnets, Shakespeare referred to his friend a Mr. W.H. though his friend’s Identity is not cleared anywhere that whoever he may be. He might be Henry Wriothesley, Earl of Southampton, or Sir Philipp Sydney’s nephew, William Herbert, third Earl of Pembroke. Shakespeare is talking about the same friend W.H. in Like as The Waves. In the sonnet, the poet is saying that his verse in praise of his friend will make him, immortal despite the cruel hands of time. This poem seems inspired by Golding’s translation of Ovid’s  Like as the waves make towards the pebbled shore, The very first opening line of the sonnet is introduced with the applied figure of speech simile. Where the poet compares the lives with the waves that come out of from the bottom of the sea and end at the shore. So do our minutes hasten to their end; In the second line, the poet said in his positive agreement format that the same way our lives within time continue and end.  Each changing plac

To Be or Not To Be ; That is the questions

One of the best examples of soliloquies in form of a monologue presented by William Shakespeare in one of his great tragedies named Hamlet Act 3, Scene 1 the lines of the poem uttered by prince Hamlet after the death of his father King Hamlet. Text To Be, Or Not To Be To be, or not to Be In this line, the question rises in Hamlet’s mind that what is he going to do, he should do or not. Here, readers know that he is thinking about committing suicide because he is feeling tormented by the fact that his mother was having an illegitimate extramarital affair with his own uncle. They have murdered his father. His father’s soul comes in his dream and asks him to take his revenge and not to hurt anyway his wife. He finds himself unable to do anything and wants to commit suicide in his madness.    Whether 'tis nobler in the mind to suffer He asks himself that is it fine to suffer in mind and take no action against anything causing trouble to a person. He is trying to analyze that

A beautiful portrait of life-cycle presented by : William Shakespeare in his Poem "The Seven Ages Of Man".

Image
Written by:  William Shakespeare in one of his play entitled “ As You Like It ” Shakespeare wrote his poem in the form of a monologue. Jacques’, one of the characters of this play speaks these lines in Act –II, scene - VII Enjoy in audio Poem  All the world's a stage, And all the men and women merely players, They have their exits and entrances, And one man in his time plays many parts, His acts being seven ages. At first the infant, Mewling and puking in the nurse's arms. Then, the whining schoolboy with his satchel And shining morning face, creeping like snail Unwillingly to school. And then the lover, Sighing like furnace, with a woeful ballad Made to his mistress' eyebrow. Then a soldier, Full of strange oaths, and bearded like the pard, Jealous in honour, sudden, and quick in quarrel, Seeking the bubble reputation Even in the cannon's mouth. And then the justice In fair round belly, with good capon lin'd, With eyes severe, and

Simile

A simile is a rhetorical figure expressing comparison or likeness that directly compares two things through some connective word such  as  like, as, so, than, or a verb such as resembles. Although similes and metaphors are generally seen as interchangeable, similes acknowledge the imperfections and limitations of the comparative relationship largely than metaphors. Examples:    Using 'as' - The use of 'as' makes the simile more explicit. 1.         She walks as gracefully as a cat. 2.         He was as hungry as a lion. 3.         He was as mean as a bull. 4.         That spider was as fat as an elephant. 5.         Cute as a kitten. 6.         As busy as a bee. 7.         As snug as a bug in a rug. 8.         Eyes as big as dinner plates.   Using ‘like’ - A simile can explicitly provide the basis of a comparison or leave this basis implicit. In the implicit case, the simile leaves the audience to determine for themselves which features of the target are being predicate